AKER
AMAUNET
AMENHOTEP, SON OF HAPU
AMENTET
AMMUT
AMUN
ANAT
ANDJETY
ANTINOUS
ANUBIS
ANUKIS
ANUPET
APEDEMAK
APIS
APOPHIS
ARENSNUPHIS
ARSAPHES
ASH
ASTARTE
ATEN
ATUM
BA’AL
BABI
BANEBDJEDET
BAST
BAT
BES
BESET
BUCHIS
DEDWEN
DUAMUTEF
DUNANWY
GEB
HA
HAPY (1)
HAPY (2)
HATHOR
HATMEHYT
HAUHET
HAURON
HEDEDYT
HEH
HEKA
HEMEN
HENET
HEQET
HERMOPOLITAN OGDOAD
HESAT
HORIT
HORUS
HORUS, SONS OF
HU
IGAI
IHY
IMHOTEP
IMSETY
IPY
ISIS
IUNYT
IUSAAS
KAUKET
KEBEHWET
KEBEHSENUF
KEK
KHENSUT
KHENTY-IRTY
KHENTY-KHETY
KHEPRI
KHERTY
KHNUM
KHONSU
KOLANTHES
MA’ET
MAFDET
MAHAF
MANDULIS
MEHEN
MEHENYT
MEHET-WERET (METHYER)
MEHYT
MENHYT
MERET
MERETSEGER
MESKHENET
MESTJET
MIHOS
MIN
MNEVIS
MONTU
MUT
NAUNET
NEBTU
NEFERTUM
NEHEBKAU
NEHMETAWAY
NEHY
NEITH
NEKHBET
NEMTY (ANTY)
NEPRY
NEPHTHYS
NUN
NUT
ONURIS
OSIRIS
PAKHET
PEDESI AND PIHOR
PTAH
QADESH
RAET (RAETTAWY)
RE
RENENUTET
RERET
RESHEP
SAH
SATIS
SEKHET
SEKHMET
SEPA
SERAPIS
SERKET
SESHAT
SETH
SHAI
SHED
SHESMETET
SHESMU
SHU
SIA
SOBEK
SOKAR
SOPED
SOTHIS
TABITHET
TAPSHAY
TATENEN
TAWERET (THOERIS)
TAYET
TEFNUT
THOTH
TJENENET
TRIPHIS (REPYT)
TUTU (TITHOES)
WADJET
WADJ-WER
WEDJARENES
WEKH
WENEG
WENUT
WENTY
WEPWAWET
YAH
YAMM

43 Responses to “Goddesses and Gods of the Ancient Egyptians: A Theological Encyclopedia”

  1. gilzean said

    This is very useful. Thank you. (Not sure how to contact you so leaving comment here)

  2. meenakshi said

    this is very informative thank you

  3. Silverwolf said

    Excellent work. Very helpful and written in an educated and scientific manner. It’s nice to find information that is not simply based on one’s personal belief.

  4. Excellent website! I am very very grateful.

  5. nico said

    could you also do a henadology on the crowns of both upper and lower Egypt and the customary items like the ankh and serekh…that would really be grateful but overall great site

  6. Tout Ankh Amoun said

    this is very rich informative site. Thank you for your efforts

    Tout Ankh Amoun

  7. Spaghetti Ninja said

    Do you have any thoughts on the Set Animal ?

    • henadology said

      Have you read the entry on Set here? There, I say that I am most persuaded by Newberry’s identification of the Set animal (the sha) as a kind of pig, now extinct. But it’s all quite speculative.

  8. Any notes on the nature of the Uraeus?

  9. [...] Voici un site anglophone qui propose d’excellents articles sourcés sur les Dieux égyptiens ! http://henadology.wordpress.com/theology/netjeru/ [...]

  10. Wonderful, rich, diverting and confusing. Which is meant to be high praise… I I know everything ultimately comes together, but is there any direct link between the female Bes, Bestet and Bastet….

    • henadology said

      No, there is no link between Beset and Bast(et); the superficial similarity in the Romanized orthography of these names is misleading.

  11. [...] Goddesses and Gods of the Ancient Egyptians: A Theological Encyclopedia, from the Henadology blog, is one of the best online resources I’ve found.  [...]

  12. [...] So, this goddess combined five goddesses, and those goddesses were (if I remember correctly): Ma’at, Hathor, Nephthys, Nekhbet, and Sothis/Sopdet. (The entries linked to there are all from Edward [...]

  13. [...] to several Neos Alexandria devotional volumes, and who has written an indispensable resource, Goddesses and Gods of the Ancient Egyptians: A Theological Encyclopedia. One of the articles he has written is called “Polycentric Polytheism and the Philosophy of [...]

  14. Nox said

    I’d like to know more about the origins of the headresses and crowns of Egypt,that’ll be very useful research.
    Henadology is quite insightful

  15. Question for you: the figures that Hachette made a while back include a deity I’ve not heard of otherwise, nor been able to find anything about, who is rendered as “Chai,” and is shown as a humanoid with a snake-head, and holding an unrolled scroll, I believe. I don’t know if this might be Sha (i.e. Ash), given in a form that is more in line with French phonetics perhaps (as many of these figures seem to be), but I wondered if you might be able to shed any light on the matter.

  16. Here it is:

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/CHAI-Egyptian-God-Figurines-Statue-with-original-package-/350551325416?pt=Toy_Soldiers&hash=item519e7cbae8

    My mistake–he’s not holding an unfurled scroll, but instead a tablet or stele of some sort.

    In any case, very intriguing, and I’d be interested in hearing what you might come up with here!

    • henadology said

      What a peculiar piece. Not exactly a standard depiction, of course, but I’m pretty confident this is meant to be Shai, with the stele evoking the textuality by means of which Egyptian thought tends to symbolize destiny.

  17. Yes, that makes sense based on what I’ve seen so far…thanks so much!

  18. Diane Shields said

    What an excellent resource – thank you so very much.

  19. Damocles Loraine said

    This geezer’s what Newton called an “Authores optimi”. Sling a butchers at his essays on Proclus! Sublime scholarship in their an all. Mr Butler I offer you my eartfelt thanks for all yer hard work.

  20. Ryn said

    Hi. I am looking through your list of netjeru. I am happy to see that you have done your research, especially since I’m a recent convert to Kemeticism. I am also writing an online guide called “Magick for Younglings.” Is it ok if I use your information for some of my entries? I am trying to help others who, like me, have had no support or resources. Take a look at mine and see what you think. Thanks.

    • henadology said

      Thank you, and you are welcome to use my entries as a resource, as long as you cite them when you use them.

      • Ryn said

        I have a separate page that I link to when I create my entries on my site. I will write the entry, place a link to my sources page, and then there is usually a hot link to the citation. I try to be good when it comes to that. I’m not about to claim that something is my own if it isn’t. Thank you very much for giving me permission.

      • henadology said

        Best of luck with your blog, I’ll be following.

      • Ryn said

        Thank you. :)

  21. […] tend to spend a lot of time researching “what my Gods mean.” I traverse websites like Henadology, taking notes on the imagery, the associations, and the mythology behind my Gods  – in an […]

  22. Hey, a question/suggestion: do you have much to say on Pataikos, i.e. the trifecta intrapantheonic syncretism of Ptah-Sokar-Osiris, and particularly his later dwarf forms from the Graeco-Roman periods?

    • And (yet more questions!), do you have any insight as to the nature of the (presumed) deity Ka, who is the leftmost deity depicted in this group?

      • henadology said

        Well that one’s not hard, he appears to be a personification of the concept of the ka. I’ve never encountered such a figure before, though, because the nature of the ka is such that one expects to see it personalized…

      • henadology said

        It occurs to me that the makers of this piece perhaps actually modeled it on images of the God Heka, such as this one (http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Heka_god_sm.gif) where his headdress shows only the “-ka” symbol, rather than his complete name. Hence, one might reasonably use this as an icon of Heka.

    • henadology said

      Nothing, at the moment, beyond what I put into Ptah’s entry. I do find him interesting; I have a tiny image of him on my altar. Perhaps I will see what some fresh research brings to light.

      • It’s one of those cases where one has to really ask the question: is this just a particularly interesting syncretism, or is it now a separate deity? I’d say both, of course (not unlike Serapis, perhaps?), but leaning more in the direction of a separate deity since he ends up being so different visually than the three from whom he comes.

      • henadology said

        I think that one can always see him as an aspect of Ptah, but perhaps the fact that the image is so distinctive conveys that the alliance of these three Gods is so powerful as to demand a new form altogether. I’d say that in the grammar of Egyptian symbolism, being a dwarf expresses something of this in itself. The dwarf is compact, condensed, more presence in less space. Perhaps in this way the dwarf is akin to iconic nudity or frontality (both of which we see in Hathor, the latter in Bes, also a dwarf).

  23. That did seem odd to me–why would there be just a personification of the general ka itself? Strange…

    But, using it as Heka makes a good deal of sense (though I wonder if they made a figure of him as well…I’m going to see if I can get a full list of them, as there’s about 150 of them, if I am not mistaken).

  24. Re: Bes–he’s also frequently nude (more so than most male Egyptian deities, with possible exceptions being Harpocrates and Ihy), so he’s got that dimension to him as well. I was thinking a lot about Bes as I was writing the above comments, and as I await the coming of my own image of Pataikos.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 195 other followers

%d bloggers like this: